Fiction Friday: 5/25/12

Posted: May 25, 2012 in Fantasy, Science Fiction, Writing
Tags: , , , , , ,

It is time for another edition of Fiction Friday, that travelogue of my journeys through the fictional realms. So where have I been and where am I going? Let’s take a look.

Blackbirds (novel)

I finished Blackbirds by Chuck Wendig last week. In case you haven’t heard of it, here’s the quick rundown: Miriam Black is a troubled young drifter who, with a skin-to-skin touch, can see your future. Specifically, the moments of your death. When the novel begins, Miriam is using this ability to live day-to-day, arriving at the moment of someone’s death and stealing enough cash and credit from them to get her to the next soon-to-be stiff. She quickly gets in over her head in a story about death, Fate, and violence. Lots and lots of violence.

The violence level got to me, I’ll admit. Miriam, for all she is a strong female lead, spends much of the book getting beaten up. Yes, she gives as good as she gets, but the violence level definitely slowed down my reading speed on this book. Balancing that is the fact that Chuck’s writing and plotting is compelling, so whenever I put the book down because I was wincing too much at what Miriam was going through, I ended up picking it back up to find out what happens next. Also, Chuck’s writing is, for lack of a better word, cool. He wields similes like scimitars and uses a distinctive, world-weary voice that is much closer in tone to his tweets and blog posts than the hammy, pulpy goodness of Dinocalypse Now (which I reviewed in an earlier Fiction Friday post, and which I enjoyed thoroughly.)

Do I recommend Blackbirds? Yes, with a caveat that if dark, violent fare is not your thing, you might want to stay away or at least steel yourself for it before reading. You can pick up Blackbirds at Amazon or DRM-free direct from the publisher.

Nightside on Callisto (short story)

I found Linda Nagata’s short story, “Nightside on Callisto,” at Lightspeed Magazine. It is set in a future where some sort of digital plague called the Red has infected all the humans on Earth, leaving only those humans who are living farther out in the solar system free to fight back against it. The story focuses on a team of four older women who are setting up an ice-mining operation on the Jovian moon, Callisto, to supply the free humans with water. This is a dangerous operation, which is why these tough-but-expendable women were sent to do it. The mission wasn’t supposed to be this dangerous, though.

I liked that the story was packed with all sorts of neat technologies, had good action scenes, and a satisfying, non-kicker ending.

The Paper Menagerie (short story)

I must admit I have never much paid attention to the various SF/F awards out there; I just read what sounds good to me. However, I saw this list of winners and nominees for the Nebula Awards, so I thought I’d check it out. I decided to read the winner in the short story category, Ken Liu’s “The Paper Menagerie,” which first appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, March/April 2011.

Wow, The Paper Menagerie is one emotional powerhouse of a story. It is about a half-Chinese/half-American boy who grows increasingly embarrassed about his Chinese immigrant mother. I admit I was a bit choked up by the end. I do find it interesting that the story contains only the barest element of magical realism. That element is vital to the story, but it is not what springs to my mind when I think of a story that would belong in a science-fiction/fantasy magazine. Ouch. I can feel my horizons being broadened. Now I’m going to have to read the other nominees in the short story category to see what else I have been missing out on.

2312 (novel)

I picked up 2312, the latest by Kim Stanley Robinson, on its release date and will have a review up once I finish it. I am 10% in (per my Kindle), and so far it is reminding me of his Mars trilogy, which is my favorite of his works. (In second place, The Years of Rice and Salt.) As usual, I have trouble getting my head around some of the science, but it is balanced with interesting characters and a mystery to pull me past the parts that make my brain melt.

Up Next on Lithicbee

Sunday: Part 15 of my SF/F serial adventure, The Only City Left. Want an easy way to catch up on the story? Check out my The Only City Left Readlist where you can read the parts in order and even send them as an ebook to the device of your choice.

Webcomics Wednesday: Each Wednesday I review some of the wonderful long-form webcomics that are out there. Not familiar with webcomics? Think comic books by passionate independent creators, released for free on the web. Check them out!

#

Photo Credits:

Header photo of rare books (cropped), courtesy of Amelia-Jane on Flickr.

Cover of Blackbirds from the publisher, Angry Robot.

Image of Callisto via Wikimedia Commons, courtesy of NASA.

Origami animals image courtesy of Jetske19 on Flickr.

About these ads

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s